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Saliva and Urine Tests for Thyroid Disease

   
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QUESTION

Are saliva or urine tests for thyroid disease accurate? -- Mary Shomon

DRS. RICHARD AND KARILEE SHAMES ANSWER

It is our contention that the saliva tests for thyroid are not yet as reliable as the saliva tests for female or adrenal hormone levels. The technology is more recent, and the technical problems are still being worked out to the satisfaction of careful practitioners.

Any new tests are worth a try as part of your overall diagnostic regimen, which should also include appropriate blood testing (insist on the Total T-3 test and not TSH being the primary indicator), regular basal temperature testing, and close monitoring of changing symptoms.

The urine tests, on the other hand, have a longer history of reliability and effectiveness. This is especially true if the tests are done at high-quality laboratories such as Vitamin Diagnostics in Cliffwood Beach, New Jersey, or especially the Broda Barnes Foundation in Trumbull, Connecticut. We have seen people whose blood tests were reported normal by top-name conventional laboratories only to finally obtain the diagnosis and treatment they have long needed when the hypothyroidism finally showed up on the urine tests.

In summary, we recommend the urine testing if a simple blood test shows normal and you have significant symptoms, low basal temperature, family history, or associated illnesses. (July, 2002)

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Dr. Richard Shames has practiced for over 30 years, written and lectured widely on thyroid-related topics, and is considered an expert in the field. He practices in San Rafael, CA. Karilee Shames has been an assistant professor of nursing, and has led thyroid support groups for many years. In addition to writing their popular book, Thyroid Power, they are regular contributors to Thyroid-Info.com, and provide a service offering thyroid coaching education sessions to consumers nationwide by telephone. For more information, see their site, www.Thyroidpower.com.

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